What is the importance of first Lohri after marriage?

  • By Ridhima Arora
  • January 13, 2021
  • 2 minutes read

 

The year 2020 was way different than what we all imagined it to be because of the pandemic worldwide. All those plans for travelling and getting married took a back seat. But still, some couples defied the difficulties and tied the knot in their intimate ceremony. As things are getting back to normal, celebrations are also getting onto the same pace. In North India, the festival of Lohri holds special importance, especially for a newly-wed couple.

 

The first Lohri of a newly-wed couple is celebrated with great pomp and show where immediate family members are invited for a feast. In Punjabi families, Lohri is celebrated with traditional dancing and singing around the bonfire. The recently wedded couple also offer dry fruits, revri, roasted peanuts, Sesame Ladoo and other foods to the fire. Then all these sweets everything is shared with their family and friends gathered around the fire.

 

Dinner served at Lohri functions generally vegetarian and traditionally, no alcoholic drinks are served. The first Lohri of a newly-wed couple is celebrated with increased fervour and on a larger scale. The families of both the newly wedded wife and husband gather around the fire in the best of their traditional clothes and enjoy the ceremony. The dress code usually remains north Indian Traditional clothes only that adds a festive touch to the ceremony.

 

The couple is also offered with gifts as blessings from friends and family on the occasion of their First Lohri. Festival of Lohri is celebrated with traditional dancing and singing around the bonfire. Logs of wood are piled together for an elaborate bonfire, and then the guests gather around it. They go around the fire three times, giving offerings of popcorns, peanuts, raveri and sweets. Then, to the beat of the dhol (traditional Indian drum), people dance around the fire. Prasad of til, peanuts, raveri, puffed rice, popcorn, gajak and sweets is distributed. This symbolizes a prayer to Agni for abundant crops and prosperity. An elaborate traditional Punjabi dinner is served, comprising shaahi paneer, ma ki daal, makki ki roti, sarson ka saag etc.

 

 

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